Alumni and donors
Giving

Private support makes a critical difference to the School of Education — from the caliber of student and faculty we are able to support to the types of impactful research we're able to puruse.

We greatly appreciate every gift made to the school, no matter what the size. Your spirit of giving is a tremendous vote of confidence as we push towards our goal of creating boldly aspirational solutions to our communities' complex problems.

To learn more about the school’s funding priorities and how you can make a gift, please review the information below, or contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Giving opportunities

There are many ways you can help support the School of Education. For more information about any of the following options, please select the appropriate header below:

Cash

Cash gifts are an easy way to give. Cash gifts of any size have an immediate impact on the school. You may give cash outright or, depending on the gift size, you may pledge over a period of time. If you itemize your tax deductions, your gift is fully deductible.

Two ways to make a cash gift:

By check

Send a check or money order made payable to the VCU Foundation, along with a letter stating where you would like your gift designated, to:

VCU School of Education
P.O. Box 842020
Richmond, VA 23284

By credit card

You may also use your credit card to make a secure gift online.

Make a gift today

Individual retirement account (IRA) assets

When retirement plan assets are rolled over and held in an IRA account, they are an excellent source of money for donors to make outright gifts to the school. For more information about using IRA funds to support our mission, please visit the VCU Foundation website or contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Make a bequest

When you leave a bequest to the school, you can make a generous gift that reduces your estate taxes without affecting your current income. You can make your wishes known by simply noting the VCU Foundation (and your designation to the VCU School of Education) as a beneficiary in your will. You can also create special funds in your name or in memory of loved ones.

For more information about making a bequest, please contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Charitable gift annuity

A gift of money or securities can be given to the school, and, in return, up to two beneficiaries can receive a fixed amount of income annually for their lifetime. This annual amount is determined by the age of the income beneficiaries at the time the gift is made.

For more information about how charitable gifts work, please contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Deferred gift annuity

Similar to the charitable gift annuity, all of the benefits under a deferred gift annuity are the same, except that payments are deferred to a future date (at least one year). By delaying payment, the donor may obtain a larger charitable income tax deduction and increase the size of the annual income. Therefore, the deferred gift annuity is an ideal retirement planning tool.

For more information about deferred gift annuities, please contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Appreciated securities

Gifts of stocks, bonds, treasuries and mutual funds that have increased in value benefit both the donor as well as the School of Education, and can be made with a simple transfer of ownership.

A gift of appreciated long-term capital gains property (such as securities) allow you to get a charitable deduction for the full, fair-market value and pay no capital gains tax on the appreciation.

For more information about how these gifts work, consult with your financial advisor, or contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Other planned giving options

Other ways of supporting the School of Education include:

Charitable remainder trust

In this financial option, a donor irrevocably transfers assets, such as cash, securities, real estate or, occasionally, certain businesses, to a trustee of his or her choice. Much like a charitable gift annuity, an income is paid to the beneficiary in either a fixed dollar amount (annuity trust) or a fixed percentage (unitrust).

Retained life estate

A retained life estate gift allows you to make a gift of a personal residence to the School of Education while retaining the right to live in the home for life. The donor is responsible for the maintenance cost, insurance and real estate taxes of the property. Please note: Having a mortgage against the home could potentially affect this gift.

Charitable lead trust

In a charitable lead trust, the income is paid first to the charity (university), and, after a number of years based on a set term or lifetime, the remainder is returned to either the donor or another beneficiary.

Life insurance

Another option for supporting the School of Education is to make the university the owner or beneficiary of your life insurance policy. This can be done on an existing policy or by establishing a new policy.

Real estate

Property, including homes, cabins, commercial buildings, and farmland can be given to the School of Education as a gift.

Retirement plan assets

Another frequently overlooked way you can make a charitable contribution to the School of Education is by using qualified retirement plan assets. In larger estates, these assets are one of the most taxed at death, as they are subject to both income and estate taxes. While current tax law does not allow you to transfer these assets directly to the school during your lifetime, naming the School of Education as the beneficiary on your account could help avoid both income and estate taxes on your account at death.

Please note: tax laws regarding gifts or life insurance policies are complex. We encourage you to consult with your financial advisor, and please feel free to contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu for further discussion.

Annual giving recognition levels

The VCU School of Education currently recognizes the following giving levels for all unrestricted and restricted gifts. Please note: the totals shown represent the amount given annually, per fiscal year:

Giving level Amount donated
Benefactor Society $10,000 and Up
John S. Oehler Society $5,000-$9,999
Oliver Hall Society $2,500-$4,999
Dean’s Circle $1,000-$2,499
Partner $500-$999
Bridge Builder $250-$499
Educator $100-$249
Supporter Up to $99

Endowed professorships and scholarships

The VCU School of Education has more than 40 endowed scholarships — permanent, self-sustaining sources of funding. Endowment assets are invested and a portion of the value of the fund (generally 5 percent) is paid out to support the fund’s purpose each year. Any earnings in excess of this distribution are used to build the fund’s market value. In this way, an endowment fund can grow and provide support for its designated purpose in perpetuity. When you establish an endowment fund, you create a permanent legacy of support to the School of Education.

Scholarships are established at an endowment level of $25,000 and higher, payable as a pledge for up to five years. Each year, a portion of the earnings from the endowment are used to assist students and the remaining balance is then reinvested in the principal.

We currently have one endowed professorship as well; these funds support research and student fellowships, and attract guest speakers for the School of Education.

If you are interested in learning about how you can create a legacy through a scholarship or professorship, please contact Ed Kardos at (804) 828-4692 or egkardos@vcu.edu.

Your dollars at work

In just the past few years, the VCU School of Education has raised more than $5 million in philanthropic gifts from alumni and friends. These gifts are making a real difference to students, faculty and staff. Your generosity is being felt all around campus, in ways such as:

Program support: Gifts are invaluable sources of funding for unique education opportunities like visiting lecturers, professional development, conferences and student research. The John S. Oehler Lecture in Educational Leadership, for example, has brought nationally known speakers to our campus to meet with students and faculty.

Student support: More than 40 students currently receive financial assistance from endowed scholarships, fellowships, awards and annual gifts to help them complete their degrees. The Virginia Arnold Scholarship, for instance, helped fund a military veteran who was returning to school to become a teacher.

Support for faculty: Endowed professorships allow the school to attract and retain top faculty from around the country. The Ruth Harris Fellowship and Professorship in Dyslexia Studies, for example, provides supplemental research support to a faculty member in the area of dyslexia.