Genevieve Siegel-Hawley, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Ph.D. Concentration Coordinator, Educational Leadership

Genevieve Siegel-Hawley, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in urban schooling, University of California, Los Angeles
  • M.Ed. in education policy and management, Harvard University
  • M.A.T. in secondary social studies, Johns Hopkins University
  • B.A. in history/sociology, University of Virginia

Research interests

Race, stratification and inequality in American schools; regional, district and school-level policies to promote diversity and reduce segregation; the relationship between school and housing segregation

Career highlights

  • Received the VCU School of Education Distinguished Junior Faculty Award in 2015
  • Received the VCU Presidential Research Quest Fund Grant Award for 2014-15

Recent publications/projects

  • Frankenberg, E., Siegel-Hawley, G., & Diem, S. (2017). Segregation by Boundary Line: The Fragmentation of Memphis Area Schools. Educational Researcher. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X17732752
  • Siegel-Hawley, G., Diem., S. & Frankenberg, E. (forthcoming). The Disintegration of Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee: School District Secession and Local Control in the 21st Century. American Educational Research Journal.
  • Siegel-Hawley, G. (2016). When the fences come down: Twenty-first century lessons from metropolitan school desegregation. Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press. http://uncpress.unc.edu/browse/book_detail?title_id=3746
  • Siegel-Hawley, G. (2013). Educational gerrymandering? Race and attendance boundaries in a racially changing suburb. Harvard Educational Review, 83(4). http://hepgjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.17763/haer.83.4.k385375245677131

Bio

Dr. Genevieve Siegel-Hawley’s research focuses on examining school segregation and resegregation in U.S. metropolitan areas, along with strategies for promoting inclusive school communities and policy options for a truly integrated society. She teaches courses dealing with racial/ethnic relations in U.S. schools, educational policy and the racial, social and political contexts of education.

Siegel-Hawley’s current projects include a book manuscript on fostering intentionally diverse and equitable schools and, with colleagues, a mixed-methods examination federally funded magnet schools.

Siegel-Hawley works with the UCLA Civil Rights Project as a research affiliate. She is a Richmond native and a proud graduate of Richmond Public Schools. Siegel-Hawley taught high school history in Baltimore City Public Schools for two years before returning home to spend two more years teaching at John Marshall High School.

Curriculum Vitae

(804) 828-8713